Moon Pies?….Kinda

Moon Pies?....Kinda

So while studying the Moon, we needed something more for our kiddos to make the connection between the Phases of the moon, the changing of the month, orbit and so on…they got the gist but it wasn’t enough.
With our kids, interest is a first priority cause they can tune you out OH SO MASTERFULLY! Thankfully inspiration hit (my good ideas are never mine 🙂 ) and I remembered some buttercream frosting in the fridge (Homemade and thus thicker than store-bought, made with vegetable oil spread actually)
We rolled 3 dollops of the plain white frosting into about 2inch diameter balls, for the Full and 2 Gibbous Moons, then stuck them in the freezer.
Then we mixed some cocoa powder into some white frosting to make the dark portions on the white frosting balls (Gibbous Moon Phases).
Next we mixed some peanut butter and cocoa into some of the white frosting and made 5 more balls (approx. same size as others) for the other Phases (2 crescents, 1 New, and 2 quarters).
We stuck those in the freezer for a bit and then “frosted” them with the leftover white frosting to make them look like the other before mentioned Phases of the Moon.
Anyway, the best part was it didn’t take long, the kids could do the majority of it, and they were totally focused.
While the “Moons” were freezing we cut up the papers and wrote the names of the phases on them, used some yellow playdoh for the side of the sun and our well-played-with-clay was all rolled into a ball to make the earth. Then we got out our “Moons” and set them up on the correct label and Voila! A memorable and tasty model of the Phases of the Moon!
P.S. The added bonus was that tonight was our Family Night and this Science activity took care of our family treat too! 

Kid-Craft: Flannel Turkey

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This project turned out so cute I just had to share. We’ve been working on sewing during our handicraft time and this past week was a flannel project. My 5 yr. old wanted to make a pumpkin (pattern coming soon!) and my 8 yr. old chose a turkey. I made the pattern for the body and showed him how it would go together and he did the rest, meaning all the other details and sewing. It took him a total of probably 1-2 hours over the course of a week.  I will just add a pattern for the feathers and face or you can freelance it if you want. He also chose not to have wings but you could add them easily (even using the feather pattern). Here it goes, first time sharing an idea with a downloadable pattern and trying to explain what we did! I tried to take pictures but I would appreciate feedback so I can improve further pattern sharing:)!

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Flannel Turkey Pattern0001

Instructions:

1.) Cut out pattern

2.) Use pattern to lightly pencil onto your desired flannel colors (we used orange for the belly and feathers, brown for the back and head, and red for some more feathers. Keep in mind that you are cutting out just one piece of flannel for each pattern piece (for each turkey you make), EXCEPT for the feathers. We used four feathers but you can cut out however many you wish, just remember that if you want your turkey to sit up by himself you’ll need him(or her:) to be balanced.

3.) Once pattern(s) have been transferred onto the flannel cut out all pieces.

4.)Sew together the belly and back first. The belly goes underneath the back, similar to a diaper. We sewed the front, then under-belly together and then turned it “inside-out” so that we could stuff it and then just sewed up the backside. (In the picture the belly is orange and the back is brown)

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5.) Tack (lightly, using small stitches) on the head just at the “neck” area so that it will stick up above the body a bit.

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6. )Tack on the eyes and beak onto the head.

7. )Sew on the feathers in a “fanned” fashion on the backside.

8.) Add any details you want (wings, feet, etc.)

9.) Set up your cute turkey to decorate for the season!

Salterrific!

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If you’re homeschooling or not, once a child becomes mobile it’s look out world! Image

From the toddler stage to about 3 is definitely a perfect time to start integrating your child into your homeschooling world. Then they are already used to the routine and have all their basic knowledge base to build on. Image

Even if you’re not homeschoolers, getting your child ready for a more formal education can start very young. Image

My goal is to share an idea a week on some of the fun learning things we’ve done that are great for the “pre-school” age child but also even older children like to join in on. Recently we did “Salt drawings”, which our whole group liked but my pre-schooler (2 yrs old) loved! Image

Depending on how messy you’re willing to let things get, there is little to no supervision for this activity. Image

Simply pour about 1-2 cups of salt on a rimmed cookie sheet and let them practice writing letters, their name, shapes, numbers…. You can play guessing games of what others are drawing or just let them feel and explain the texture and experiment with shaping and building with the salt. If you’re not in for the mess you can also put about 1 cup of salt in a gallon-size Ziploc bag and seal it and lay it flat on the table and let them draw that way. Though personally, as frustrating as it can be at times, I think more learning gets done with a bit of mess making! Image

Have fun!